Photography – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 05:32:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png Photography – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 photographer Jamel Shabazz captures the joy and sadness in the streets https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-jamel-shabazz-captures-the-joy-and-sadness-in-the-streets/ Wed, 18 May 2022 03:39:19 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-jamel-shabazz-captures-the-joy-and-sadness-in-the-streets/ For Jamel Shabazz’s first institutional survey (until September 4), the Bronx Museum of the Arts presents more than 150 images taken by the prolific photographer, who has dedicated decades to documenting his native Brooklyn. The son of a Navy photographer who later supported his family by taking portraits and photographing weddings, Shabazz grew up in […]]]>

For Jamel Shabazz’s first institutional survey (until September 4), the Bronx Museum of the Arts presents more than 150 images taken by the prolific photographer, who has dedicated decades to documenting his native Brooklyn. The son of a Navy photographer who later supported his family by taking portraits and photographing weddings, Shabazz grew up in a home of cameras and photography books. As a young man, he discovered he could use photography to celebrate his community and to build and maintain deep connections with those around him.

On the occasion of his exhibition, Shabazz reflects on how he grew up as a photographer, on the 20 years he spent working as a prison guard at Rikers Island, the largest and most New York’s notorious, and how his work continues to touch the souls of a new generation.

The Art Newspaper: What inspired you to take pictures?

Jamal Shabazz: My father was a professional photographer. He transformed our small apartment in Brooklyn into a studio on the weekends and he photographed family and friends. He would rearrange everything. He also photographed weddings. So I always grew up seeing camera gear. He also had a huge library of photography books, and that intrigued me from the start. And we also had family photo albums that were passed down from generation to generation.

Man and dog. Lower East Side, Manhattan (1980)

Courtesy of the artist

I often talk about one book in particular that really changed my life when I was about eight years old: black in white america by Leonard Freed [1969]. My dad had this bookcase, but this particular book was sitting on the coffee table and it was signed by Freed. This book was the first time I had seen photographs outside of my Brooklyn community. Suddenly I was introduced to places like Harlem or the Isolated South, and I didn’t really understand what I was seeing, but a lot of the photos reminded me of myself. I felt like the book was introducing me to a world I was about to step into.

What was your approach when you started photographing?

My mom always had these cameras with film in them so I grabbed a camera and went to my local high school and started photographing my friends. I didn’t understand light very well, but I knew how to compose images from looking at photographs very early on. We would all participate, and then we would have the film developed at the local pharmacy. There was something magical about this camera. When I picked it up and looked through its crosshairs, it opened up a part of my mind I didn’t know existed.

Then I went to the army at 17 and came back at 20, in 1980. My father taught me photography and my first photographs were, according to him, very depressing. I started photographing poverty, homelessness, despair, alcoholism. I was curious. I’ve seen the billions of dollars generated for the military budget, and then I come back to America and see these social conditions that bother me. My father didn’t understand why I would photograph these conditions, so I redirected my energy, unconsciously, and started capturing joy, love and friendship.

I started using my camera to talk to people about life, goals and objectives. I was looking for joy and friendship, but beyond photography, I was really looking to have conversations with people, and the photographs became evidence of those conversations. But I never stopped my personal project of documenting social conditions too.

Embrace the feeling. Flatbush, Brooklyn (1982). When Shabazz began photographing scenes and people in Brooklyn, his father said his images were “depressing”, so he “redirected his energy” to “capture the joy, love and friendship”.

Courtesy of the artist

I think, in your best pictures, it’s all in there. There is sadness as well as love and joy, and they coexist in a single image.

When I look at my negatives, it’s all there. In contact sheets, it’s a combination. In every situation I seek joy, but I cannot ignore social conditions. In my contact sheets going back to the 1980s, when you look at them all, it’s a combination of the two [sadness and joy]-It’s almost 50/50.

What do you think is the future of photography?

I think the future of photography is pretty much here. It’s funny – in the 1980s I was trying to encourage people to get involved, but now everyone is embracing it. Now, it’s just this global language that really brings people around the world together into a global community. I can’t imagine it getting any better.

A lot of that comes down to personal relationships for you.

I look at the camera like a compass and I feel like everyone I meet on this life path is due to that compass. The friendships that have developed during these interactions are phenomenal. I consider myself an alchemist – having the ability to freeze time and motion is phenomenal to me. That’s how I see it. Being able to see something that just touches your heart and take that camera and capture that moment, freeze it and then throw it away and share it with the universe.

Jamel Shabazz: eyes in the street, Bronx Museum of the Arts, until September 4

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Landscape photographer Scott Seiler finds inspiration in community and volunteerism – InForum https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/landscape-photographer-scott-seiler-finds-inspiration-in-community-and-volunteerism-inforum/ Mon, 16 May 2022 12:15:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/landscape-photographer-scott-seiler-finds-inspiration-in-community-and-volunteerism-inforum/ FARGO — Fargo-based photographer Scott Seiler is well known in the local art scene for his panoramic images of North Dakota and Minnesota landscapes. His use of lines and geometry is surprisingly emotional and helps bring out the personality of the spaces he captures with his camera. An artist whose work often requires long stays […]]]>

FARGO — Fargo-based photographer Scott Seiler is well known in the local art scene for his panoramic images of North Dakota and Minnesota landscapes. His use of lines and geometry is surprisingly emotional and helps bring out the personality of the spaces he captures with his camera.

An artist whose work often requires long stays away, the other side of Seiler is a bit more social. Whether he’s promoting art as part of his daily job in Sanford Health’s marketing department or volunteering with the

Fargo Moorhead Visual Artists

sitting on the board of directors

The artistic partnership

and acting as President of

Gallery 4

art, promoting art and being in community are at the heart of his efforts.

As an artist who loves getting to know the community, we wanted to take a moment to learn a bit more about the artist himself. Meet Scott Seiler.

Dandelions at Sunset by Scott Seiler.

Contributed / Scott Seiler

Q: Are there any artists in particular that inspire you?

A: Ansel Adams, a photographer who took great black and white photos. When I was little it was probably his work that got me excited about photography and what you can do. It just amazes me at the equipment they had at the time. Photographers would talk more about the concept of room dimensions: ratios and composition. The composition rules have not changed, but the equipment has changed.

I think some of the early photographers had to do a lot more to get that great shot than we do today. I also think a lot of people sometimes forget about composition, the rules of thirds, and other rules that really help people bring attention to the subject.

Maya Angelou was an inspiration to me later. I think the delivery of the writing is essential. I like to hear him recite his own poetry. There are inflections, pauses, etc., which have a big impact, and the message is delivered better and more succinctly.

Q: Which local artists do you admire?

A: I think they all inspire me. With the more established artists, I love seeing what they’ve been up to over the years and how they’ve grown. With new artists, what intrigues me are the different concepts they come up with. They always have a story to tell about their art. I like this. I’m not a painter – I can’t paint all my life – so I’m intrigued by people who do. How they can paint freehand, what their concept is, how they add layers and it grows. It’s just amazing to me, so I try to absorb as much as I can. Every day I try to learn something new about art. I’m just trying to keep my eyes open.

5x7 Christmas Day Frost 2019.jpg

The Christmas Day frost photographed in 2019 by Scott Seiler.

Contributed / Scott Seiler

Q: What’s your favorite way to find creative inspiration?

A: Driving is dangerous for me. It’s my time alone and I’m processing so much information and it’s so visually appealing. I probably get more creative when I’m in the car, because it’s clear, the roads are clear, the space is clear, and I can think better. I come up with a lot of concepts, so when I get to a location to shoot, I try to think, “How can I do this differently? How can I present this landscape in a different way than other photographers have done before? How can I really show the beauty of this landscape?

Q: What do you do when you feel uninspired?

A: A martini? I laugh! Especially today, people are inundated with messages and the brain has been so stretched that sometimes we just need to have some downtime. I think it’s OK to do nothing. Or I could take a walk, ride a bike, or take a drive. These are some of the things I just don’t have to think about. I go there constantly, and this downtime allows me to recuperate, rest and then get back to work.

Q: Is there anything you wish people knew about your art?

A: The most important thing to know is that each of my photos has a story to tell, whether it’s a personal story for me, or a geographic location in the state, or something I came across. When I tell people about my pieces, they like to start a conversation about them. It’s “Why did you do that?” or, “What inspired you?” And most often, they live a similar experience that they will tell about on their side. It’s not just a conversation starter, it’s an interaction, almost a bonding experience of shared stories.

Check out local artist Scott Seiler at

Facebook

or its website,

http://www.scottseiler.net/

.

Brandi Malarkey, TAP Partner and Community Content Contributor, is a multidisciplinary artist, writer, administrator and occasional artist. She is a collector of dead bugs and good books, and believes that ordinary miracles and small kindnesses have the power to change the world. Learn more about Brandi on her website:

www.itsallmalarkey.com

.

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Sarah Jenkins’ passion for drone photography was ignited during the COVID lockdown. Now she’s an award-winning designer https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/sarah-jenkins-passion-for-drone-photography-was-ignited-during-the-covid-lockdown-now-shes-an-award-winning-designer/ Sat, 14 May 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/sarah-jenkins-passion-for-drone-photography-was-ignited-during-the-covid-lockdown-now-shes-an-award-winning-designer/ The sun beats down on Sarah Jenkins’ right shoulder as her daughter lifts her into a deckchair by the pool. Her hands curl up and grip the poles as she is hoisted into the air and swung. His toes find the water first, then his ankles, then all but his green eyes dip below the […]]]>

The sun beats down on Sarah Jenkins’ right shoulder as her daughter lifts her into a deckchair by the pool.

Her hands curl up and grip the poles as she is hoisted into the air and swung. His toes find the water first, then his ankles, then all but his green eyes dip below the surface.

Except for the green noodle she uses to support her arms, Sarah swims unassisted. This is the only time she can move on her own.

“The most important thing I can do is swim every day…I think swimming basically saved my life,” she says.

“I can’t use a standard camera and I can’t use a cell phone – I can’t hold it,” Sarah says.(Provided: Sarah Jenkins)

Sarah moves from side to side of the pool, each step slow but deliberate. She grabs the side for extra support.

While walking, she has the impression of “zapping” her leg. “It doesn’t happen most of the day,” she says. “[Swimming] just gives me the most amazing feeling and sensation, because you stimulate the nerves.”

It was this sense of freedom that led Sarah to find her new passion – drone photography – during the height of the lockdown.

“The funny thing is, I can’t take a picture with another camera,” she says.

“I can’t use a standard camera and I can’t use a cell phone – I can’t hold it up.”

Get the diagnosis

Sarah lives with Girdle Muscular Dystrophy called LGMD2i (also known as FKRP-related LGMD R9), one of the world’s rare diseases. This started showing up in his late teens as his performance declined while swimming.

“I thought, oh, it’s just puberty, I’m just slowing down.”

When Sarah started her nursing career, people asked her why she was limping as she walked down the hall.

“I would say I don’t limp…people noticed that before me,” she says.

“When I was 30, I went to an aerobics class, and we all had to stand on our tiptoes, and I couldn’t. So I went, okay, that’s weird. .. and that’s when I started doing tests.”

A woman in sunglasses holds a baby in a yellow life jacket, on a boat
Sarah with baby Lucy(Provided: Sarah Jenkins)

Only a few hundred or thousands of people in Australia are thought to have LGMD2i.

“It affects your breathing muscles, so your diaphragm and intercostal muscles that help your lungs expand and contract are weakened,” Sarah says. “So my breathing is affected and that’s usually what ends the life of someone with muscular dystrophy. It’s respiratory failure or heart failure – or both.”

After being diagnosed, Sarah became pregnant with her first daughter Lucy and a year later with her second daughter Tess. It was during this period of her life that she began to experience a decline in her condition.

“I remember when I used to sit on the grass for picnics. And I thought to myself that one day I won’t be able to get up.”

That moment came in 2016, when her dog Pippa ran under her legs in her narrow hallway and she broke her leg.

“Since that day, I have never stood up again. I have never walked. I have never driven a car…my whole life has changed dramatically.”

Dizzying thinking and a new sense of purpose

Drones came into Sarah’s life at a time when her world was shrinking, as COVID lockdowns drew closer.

During Melbourne’s long lockdown, her daughter Lucy came to live with her in Port Douglas and together they decided to buy one.

“We just said, what are we going to do? We have to do something. I really couldn’t do anything in the community, because I was at high risk for COVID, I pretty much had to isolate myself from people , “Sarah said.

Shot from above, a woman in a bathing suit sits in a floating pool in the middle of a blue basketball court
Sarah and Lucy Jenkins’ award-winning photo, It’s Called Compromise.(Provided: Sarah Jenkins)

She admits that she was initially terrified of crashing it and didn’t want to pilot it herself.

“I gradually gained confidence flying it, and just saw Earth from a different perspective.”

In November 2020, Sarah hosted a photo shoot inspired by COVID lockdowns and a recent piece of art she had painted.

“I just had this idea of ​​using a basketball court, just down the street, and I thought, what if I put this girl in the middle of the court, reading a magazine, supposedly having a great time, in the midst of the chaos that reigned in the world, compromising to always be happy and enjoy life?”

She went to buy a billiard ring and borrowed a small bag.

“It was 10 a.m. and it was so hot,” Sarah recalled of the shoot. “The poor girl had to sit on a towel under the pool ring, and we just had to measure. She was in the middle of the field, and I put the drone in place, and I just started shooting.”

The Boston Drone Film Festival found Sarah and Lucy’s photo on their Instagram page, Air Bare Studio, and asked them to enter it in their contest.

Much to their delight, their image won the architecture category in 2021, less than a year after they started experimenting with the drone.

“We felt a bit undeserved of the award as we lacked experience…but it gave us the confidence to enter another competition, Capture Magazine’s Best Emerging Australasia Photographers” , says Sarah.

The same image won this award in the Single Shot category.

An international publishing house recently chose 16 of Sarah and Lucy’s images for its new book on minimalism in photography.

A painting of a woman in a red swimsuit in a pink pool float, in a swimming pool
The painting that inspired Sarah’s award-winning photo.(Provided: Sarah Jenkins)

Reigniting Creativity

Sarah says taking a drone helped her rekindle her creativity through a new lens.

She enjoyed painting in school and in her early adult years and since then has had a deep appreciation for art and design.

“Photography is no different from creating a painting – it’s all about composition, orientation, framing, color and tone, and it has to tell a story,” she says.

Shot from above, a girl in a sundress and hat appears to be running down the stairs against a chalky black background
Lucy in Don’t forget the pineapple bag.

“I really like to look at things in a minimalistic way…focusing on a particular section of an image for quirky and unique things.

“You have to look at things from so many different perspectives to understand the true meaning.”

Still, she laughs: “We don’t always hit the mark.”

Even though Lucy is back in Melbourne, Sarah has continued to experiment and is looking forward to studying an online photography course this year.

“Photography just made me realize that this is something I absolutely can do,” she says. “The drone can take me to places I can’t physically access and create images I normally couldn’t get to.”

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Announcing the winners of the Royal Horticultural Photographic Competition 2022 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/announcing-the-winners-of-the-royal-horticultural-photographic-competition-2022/ Tue, 10 May 2022 14:16:14 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/announcing-the-winners-of-the-royal-horticultural-photographic-competition-2022/ If you enjoy photographing plants and flowers, you’ll love this year’s winning photos from the Royal Horticultural Society Photographic Competition. The competition celebrates the beauty of gardens and wildlife and attracts thousands of entries from amateur and professional photographers. The winner of Plant and adult competitions in general the winner was Sanjay Jani with its […]]]>

If you enjoy photographing plants and flowers, you’ll love this year’s winning photos from the Royal Horticultural Society Photographic Competition. The competition celebrates the beauty of gardens and wildlife and attracts thousands of entries from amateur and professional photographers.

The winner of Plant and adult competitions in general the winner was Sanjay Jani with its beautifully evocative image of a saffron crocus taken in Iowas City, Iowa growing near a wall at golden hour.

Winner of the under-11s and the overall youth classification

Alex Chapman: Worlds Collide

The austere beauty of life reflected in a winter pond at RHS Garden Hyde Hall, Essex, on a sunny January day parallels the Three Worlds series of lithographs by Dutch artist MC Escher. Shot on an iPhone XR

Gardens

Andrea Jones: Illuminating the past and present

Interspersed with topiary yews, Stipa gigantea, roses and herbaceous perennials, such as Salvia nemorosa ‘Amethyst’, create a lapidary of color in the early morning light at Madresfield Court, Worcestershire. Taken on a Nikon D850

Welcoming wildlife

Weinong Duan: Spread wings

The awe-inspiring beauty of an eagle owl, wings spread and ready to pounce on its prey in the grassland below. Taken in Yangquan City, Shanxi Province, China using a Canon EOS-1DX Mark ll

Macro

Marek Mierzejewski: Green stars (Equisetum arvense, horsetail)

Wandering through the grasslands of Gdansk, Poland with his camera, the photographer was unaware of the exquisite beauty of the Equisetum arvense (field horsetail) beneath his feet – until the impressive rows of green stars were revealed through the macro lens of his Canon EOS 6D Marc II.

Creative

Mr. Asker Ibn Firoz: Bat in action!

Just before sunset in Ramna Park, Dhaka, Bangladesh, hundreds of Indian flying foxes dive into the city lake to bathe and drink. As this megabat rose from the water, its iconic silhouette, haloed in golden light, was captured on a Nikon D500

Indoor gardening

Kam Hong Leung: A labor of love

A worker from RBG Kew tends to the plants in the Waterlily House, which was designed to showcase the giant Amazon water lily (Victoria amazonica). Shot on a Panasonic DMC-F272

social media

Sara Bishop: Urban summer meadow

The tactile beauty of a summer meadow at its peak, buzzing with wildlife and cheerful flowers, is celebrated in this image taken during a family walk through Abbey Gardens, Bury St Edmunds. Shot on a Canon 5D Mark IV

Under 18

Lucie Havelange: Aerial beauty

Beneath the grandeur of the temple of Angkor Wat in Cambodia, this decorative little dragonfly caught the eye of the photographer, who sought to capture its intricate beauty.

Other shortlisted entries and finalists can be seen on the RHS website.

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Native American faces tear gas, baton charges and rubber bullets – Camille Seaman’s best photography | Art and design https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/native-american-faces-tear-gas-baton-charges-and-rubber-bullets-camille-seamans-best-photography-art-and-design/ Wed, 04 May 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/native-american-faces-tear-gas-baton-charges-and-rubber-bullets-camille-seamans-best-photography-art-and-design/ IIn the United States, there have been hundreds of treaties made with Indigenous peoples and not one – not one – has ever been honoured. Reserves have been created and it has been said, “This land will be yours from time immemorial”, but then it shrinks and shrinks forever. In 2016, there was a massive […]]]>

IIn the United States, there have been hundreds of treaties made with Indigenous peoples and not one – not one – has ever been honoured. Reserves have been created and it has been said, “This land will be yours from time immemorial”, but then it shrinks and shrinks forever.

In 2016, there was a massive protest against the Dakota Access pipeline. The original plan was for this pipeline to run from the oil fields in the northwest corner of North Dakota through Bismarck, the state’s wealthy capital, and then on to its destination. But someone in Bismarck said, “It’s not okay. It’s dangerous,” because they knew it wasn’t a matter of ifbut when a pipeline will leak.

The pipeline route was therefore changed to cross the Standing Rock Reservation and cross the Missouri River. Standing Rock belongs to the Hunkpapa Lakota, or Sioux, tribe. It is the land of the Sitting Bull people, and the Missouri River provides drinking water to more than 80 million people in the United States.

A woman, LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, appealed on social media saying, “Please come join us in protecting water. I don’t think she had any idea how big it would get. At one point, there were over 30,000 people. They came from Africa, the Maori came from New Zealand, the native Japanese came from Hokkaido, and there were Sami and Tibetan monks. People came from all over the world to say, “Enough is enough”. They came to protect nature, water and the rights of indigenous peoples, and to protest that another treaty was not being respected. It was about not poisoning our the water.

The protest also aimed to physically prevent work from being carried out on the pipeline. When the protests started, I was working on We Are Still Here, a series of photographs of Native Americans. I heard about Standing Rock and knew I had to go record it. I knew it was a historic moment. My mother is part African American, a descendant of slaves, and my father is Shinnecock Montaukett, a small whaling tribe from the tip of Long Island. I didn’t take part in the protests themselves, but I was documenting what was happening. I thought it was important, as an Indigenous person, to have the opportunity to tell the story through an Indigenous lens.

I had to leave at the end of October, when this photo was taken, but the protests lasted all winter. This particular image was the last I did there. The six weeks I was there, I had seen Dan everywhere. I kept saying, “I really want to do a portrait of you,” but there was never an opportunity. The day I was leaving, I saw him on the road and I said to him, “I have to leave. But let me take this photo. That’s what I have.

Dan Nanamkin is from the Confederated Colville Tribes of Washington State. Every day he showed up in full dress. He is one of the most prayerful and peaceful people. He sang all the time, and wherever people needed help, he was there. I didn’t ask him for this photo. I literally only had a few seconds to make two images of him, and this was one. His body language seems to say, “Why? Why?”

This road we stood on was the real way Sacagawea LEDs Lewis and Clarke along the westward expedition in the early 1800s as part of their mission to explore and map the newly acquired territory of Louisiana.

Residents of Standing Rock created a blockade on this road, on the other side of which was a massive force with batons, tear gas, rubber bullets and sonic cannons. All of this was used against peaceful people, to defend the oil. Black smoke is from someone burning tires as part of the roadblock.

This first demonstration was during the Obama administration, and finally Obama said, “OK, no pipeline.” When Trump was elected, the first thing he did was sign an order for the pipeline to be completed. He ordered a much larger force of National Guard and law enforcement to dismantle the protest, and the pipeline continued.

Many protesters went to jail; many have endured incredible hardships. The tribe has always fought this pipeline in court, and now they are waiting and hoping for Biden to shut it down. The most recent update is that they found out the pipeline was built illegally, because the company didn’t do the full environmental assessments, now what? That’s where they are.

My job as a photographer is to show people something they may not have seen before, or to show something in a new way, to create more empathy and compassion and to expand the knowledge that the people of our world have. All in all, I think humans don’t deserve this planet. We don’t act like we deserve it. I know there will be a future – I don’t know if it will be a beautiful one.

There’s a saying from Oaxaca: “You crushed us into the ground, but you didn’t know we were seeds.” After Standing Rock, there is no pipeline without protest. It was an amazing experience to document.

Camille MarineBooks by include The Big Cloud and Melting Away, published by Princeton Architectural Press.

Camilla Marine. Photography: Tala Powis Parker

Resume of Camille Marin

Born: Long Island, New York, 1969.
Qualified: Studied photography with Jan Groover and John Cohen at Purchase College, State University of New York.
Affecting : Edward Burtynsky, Teru Kuwayama.
High point: “An exhibit in a museum at the University of Delaware where my belongings filled the whole hall of the museum, and in a little antechamber to the side were little pictures of Herbert Ponting, Frank Hurley, and all the white men who had photographed the polar regions. It was like I had left a mark that was part of this record now, and that was a woman.
Low point: “I almost died of dengue fever in Fiji.
Trick : “Spend time finding the way you see, and don’t try to copy the work of other photographers.

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Baltimore photographer’s love of the city inspires award-winning images – CBS Baltimore https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/baltimore-photographers-love-of-the-city-inspires-award-winning-images-cbs-baltimore/ Mon, 02 May 2022 16:37:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/baltimore-photographers-love-of-the-city-inspires-award-winning-images-cbs-baltimore/ BALTIMORE (WJZ) — When you walk around Baltimore with Devin Allen, you can’t help but see things differently. Under Allen’s discerning eye, often overlooked details come to life. Allen’s style of photography puts you at ease, even when you are the subject of his striking images. READ MORE: Dundalk fire that displaced 16 people caused […]]]>

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — When you walk around Baltimore with Devin Allen, you can’t help but see things differently.

Under Allen’s discerning eye, often overlooked details come to life. Allen’s style of photography puts you at ease, even when you are the subject of his striking images.

READ MORE: Dundalk fire that displaced 16 people caused by outdoor chicken fryer, officials say

Allen, an award-winning photographer who gained national attention for his portrayal of Baltimore, recently spoke with WJZ about his work.

“The streets are my studio, it’s where I create,” Allen said. “I love it, because if you miss it, you miss it. You’re always chasing a fleeting moment.

Allen’s images graced the cover of Weather magazine not once but twice. Her portrayal of the unrest in Baltimore in 2015 following the death in custody of Freddie Gray is featured in her book, “A Beautiful Ghetto.”

In October, Allen will publish a second book, this one titled “No Justice, No Peace: From the Civil Rights Movement to Black Lives Matter,” which features photographs, essays, and poetry.

Allen was even featured in “Strong Black Lens,” a Netflix digital series.

“Photography really saved my life,” he said. “It gave me purpose. It gave me power. It gave me a voice.”

Allen said photography took him out of his comfort zone and broadened his horizons beyond Baltimore.

“It allowed me to explore Baltimore and really understand Baltimore on a whole new level, but it also took me around the world,” Allen said. “Sometimes I meet people who don’t even understand what I’m saying because of my Baltimore accent. But with photography, they know what I’m trying to say. I love how it connects people. It can be people together, but it can also solve serious problems.

READ MORE: Where’s Marty? Learn some tips from Spencer Horsman, Baltimore’s very own illusionist

Allen captures critical moments in history.

“Freddie Gray passed away and I was able to document those moments, be on the front lines and on the cover of Time magazine,” he said. “This blanket has strengthened my community. It put my community on a platform. But it also gave me a voice to give back to my own community. Whether it’s working with young people or visiting schools, I open doors that weren’t open to us before.

This commitment is evident in the way Allen rehabilitates his grandmother’s home in West Baltimore, which has been in the family for more than four decades. Lovingly, as he flipped through a pile of his photo albums, Allen said his grandmother was the first photographer he had ever known.

“My family is very close,” he said. “My grandmother growing up was like a second mother. I grew up in this house. Everyone in my family did. I had my first fight here. I went to high school over here. He has so many memories.

Even with a career that could take him anywhere in the world, Allen remains in Baltimore.

“Baltimore is my home,” he said. “I’ve been here all my life. I love this city. Growing up was really hard here. So I found myself in this position of artist and photographer now that I inspire children and the community. So I want to be part of the change in Baltimore.

Allen even imagines his house as an incubation space for young creatives. With each accomplishment, he says, he keeps moving forward, thinking of his daughter and the next generation.

“My success is not just mine, it’s that of my community. Because it is the community that gave birth to me. From all the hardships to all the positives, they made me who I am. So I want to make sure I give that back,” Allen said.

“I’ve been counted out so many times. I was shot at, I had bullets going past my head. I saw people die, I was arrested. Treat depression, anxiety, PTSD. But even in my darkest moments, I keep pushing. Just know that you are not alone. I know what it feels like when you hit rock bottom. But as long as you’re here and as long as you’re breathing, you always have a chance to change your life and find a new path.

NO MORE NEWS: Secret tapes of people found at late music teacher’s home, Baltimore County police say

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Sam Raimi tackles extensive additional photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/sam-raimi-tackles-extensive-additional-photography/ Sun, 01 May 2022 00:43:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/sam-raimi-tackles-extensive-additional-photography/ Marvel Studios has been hard at work on the sequel strange doctor, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness for a few years and the movie should officially be released in a week. the strange doctor the sequel went through reshoots in late 2021, and the film appears to be in great shape. rolling stone […]]]>

Marvel Studios has been hard at work on the sequel strange doctor, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness for a few years and the movie should officially be released in a week. the strange doctor the sequel went through reshoots in late 2021, and the film appears to be in great shape. rolling stone recently did a profile on film director Sam Raimi and he revealed the main goals of the reshoots.

“There are a lot of points where the audience says, ‘I don’t understand that. I don’t understand that concept.” Or, “I’m aware of that concept, and then you explained it again in the third act.” “Oh, you’re right. The audience already knows that.” Or: “They had to know that to accept the rhythm of this next story.” Much of it is test screenings, learning what’s confusing about a complex image like this here, or learning about things that have overstayed their welcome,” Raimi told the magazine. “Recognizing when something is too slow, and even if it’s a good beat to put on, the audience doesn’t need it. They can figure it out on their own, so what seemed like a logical step now becomes, in the editing process, “Hmm. It slows us down. Let’s skip that and let the audience take the leap for themselves. But it’s also about acknowledging what he really likes and sometimes expanding on the things he responds to really well. It’s about recognizing what’s original in the image, and when you’ve had the opportunity to develop that.”

It’s been a long road to get Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. Marvel Studios filmed the sequel during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic and was hit with major delays. Cumberbatch recently opened up about how difficult filming the sequel was. In a chat with Deadline for his Oscar-nominated Netflix movie The power of the dogthe actor spoke of the “difficult” production process.

“It’s been tough. I’ll be honest with you. It’s had quite the journey, this movie. But not in some kind of poor me, just like the nature of where we’re at,” Benedict Cumberbatch explained. . “Trying to make a massive movie like this under the constraints of a pandemic and the delays that followed, in part because of The power of the dog, but also because of everything that was lined up and had to be pushed back from Marvel. It was hard for everyone. Also, incredibly enjoyable and no less enjoyable than the first.”

Marvel Studios describes Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness reads: “To restore a world where everything is changing, Strange enlists the help of his ally Wong, the Sorcerer Supreme, and the Avengers’ most powerful Scarlet Witch, Wanda. But a terrible threat looms over humanity and the world. “The entire universe that is no longer can be made by their power alone. Even more surprisingly, the universe’s greatest threat looks exactly like Doctor Strange.

The film is directed by the legendary Sam Rami and will star Benedict Cumberbatch as Doctor Strange, Benedict Wong as Wong, Rachel McAdams as Christine Palmer, Elizabeth Olsen as Wanda Maximoff/Scarlet Witch, Patrick Stewart as Professor Charles Xavier, Xochitl Gomez in America Chavez. and Chiwetel Ejiofor as Baron Mordo. Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness is set to hit theaters on May 5, 2022!

What do you think of the director’s comments? Let us know your thoughts in the comments section below or by hit our writer @NateBrail on Twitter!

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FAA says Youtuber crashed his plane on purpose https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/faa-says-youtuber-crashed-his-plane-on-purpose/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 00:18:33 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/faa-says-youtuber-crashed-his-plane-on-purpose/ Most photographers and videographers have gone out of their way to get a shot, but few have ever been so reckless as Trevor Jacob who, according to his Wikipedia page, “is an American snowboard cross competitor, extreme sports athlete, YouTuber, and former pilot”. .” And it’s this ‘elder’ we’re here to talk about because Jacob […]]]>

Most photographers and videographers have gone out of their way to get a shot, but few have ever been so reckless as Trevor Jacob who, according to his Wikipedia page, “is an American snowboard cross competitor, extreme sports athlete, YouTuber, and former pilot”. .” And it’s this ‘elder’ we’re here to talk about because Jacob apparently deliberately crashed his plane in a now-viral YouTube video.

The YouTube video

Related: A GoPro camera went to space, got lost, came back with great images of Earth

On November 24, 2021, Jacob was flying solo aboard the Taylorcraft BL-65, a small single-engine aircraft, over California’s Los Padres National Forest when he – at least according to Jacobs – experienced engine failure and had to parachute to safety and back to civilization.

Then, on Dec. 23, 2021, Jacob posted the nearly 13-minute YouTube video titled “I Crashed My Plane,” featuring multiple angles of the crash and his supposedly life-saving parachute jump. Almost immediately, the details of his story were called into question.

Experts weigh

Like Airplane and Pilot the magazine explains in an editorial, video of Jacob’s crash raised only red flags from other pilots and aviation experts:

It was too perfectly choreographed. Jacob was wearing a skydiving parachute, the T’Craft’s door appears to be unlocked before the engine cuts out, the fuel selector appears to be off, according to a T-Craft owner, and the pilot’s reactions seem less than spontaneous in response to what many suspects were a false emergency. Everything seemed perfectly set up to make a video.

In the same way, the New York Times points that Jacob did not take any of the usual actions a pilot would take in a real emergency. He did not attempt to restart the engine or call air traffic control. He also points out Jacob’s parachute—”you don’t fly a small plane with a parachute”—and the fact that he could have landed safely even without an engine, as well as other incongruous details of the footage.

In short, nothing in the video was suitable for people in the know. And neither, it seems, with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Allowed to walk

On April 11, 2022, the FAA completed its investigation into Jacob’s accident. In a letter to Jacob, he determined that he violated federal aviation regulations and flew in a “reckless or reckless manner so as to endanger the life or property of another.” He immediately revoked his private pilot certificate, prohibiting him from flying.

For what it’s worth, Jacob seems to be fighting the decision. In another youtube videohe claimed his lawyer advised him not to talk about the plane crash, “but the truth about this situation will come out in time.”

Given the evidence stacked against him, it seems unlikely that he will take to the air himself anytime soon.

Stupid all around

I guess the big takeaway here is that if you’re going to fake something for a YouTube video, at least do it right (just kidding, of course). Giving the government agency investigating your negligence all the evidence they need to arrest you is almost as foolish as deliberately crashing a plane in the first place.

So yeah, maybe the next time you’re considering pushing the boundaries of common sense or the law on a shoot, stop and think for a few minutes – and if you have a plane, don’t crash it.

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Best settings for bird photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/best-settings-for-bird-photography/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 09:13:10 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/best-settings-for-bird-photography/ The best settings for bird photography vary depending on whether you’re trying to capture a portrait in a quiet moment or an active bird in flight. There are, of course, all kinds of ways to photograph birds and to capture them you have to adapt your approach from moment to moment. We’ve shown you the […]]]>

The best settings for bird photography vary depending on whether you’re trying to capture a portrait in a quiet moment or an active bird in flight. There are, of course, all kinds of ways to photograph birds and to capture them you have to adapt your approach from moment to moment. We’ve shown you the best cameras for wildlife photography, but how do you get the most out of your creative tool?

In this guide, we’ve broken down the different types of bird photos one might want to take and provided the best settings for bird photography for every occasion. We’ll show you which exposure settings to use, plus tips on framing, focusing and more.

Best Camera Settings for Basic Bird Photos

The strongest animal portraits are when you frame the subject at eye level, and the same principle applies to bird portraits. Using a medium to long telephoto lens (something around 300mm to 500mm) will give you a suitable distance from your subject and allow you to fill the frame with it.

Go down to ground level at his level and frame the shot. Not only does this provide good eye contact and maximum impact, but it also reduces the amount of background in your image. Plus, that long lens you’re using will help diffuse the background with its limited depth of field.

You’ll want to shoot in your camera’s aperture priority mode and use an aperture of around f/4 or f/5.6. This will provide a good level of background blur but enough depth of field to ensure the bird’s face is in focus.

Depending on light levels, feel free to increase your ISO up to 1600 or 3200. Some of the best cameras for bird photography produce sharp images even at ISO 6400 and above. But as a general rule, keep your ISO as low as possible while still keeping the shutter speed fast enough for the scene.

A good rule of thumb to make sure your shutter speed is fast enough to prevent camera shake is to multiply your camera’s crop factor by the effective focal length of the lens. Canon, for example, has a crop factor of 1.6x. So if you were using a 300mm lens, 1.6×300 is 480mm. This means you would need a shutter speed of at least 1/500sec.

Best camera settings for bird portraits

  • Shutter speed: 1/200s
  • Aperture: f/8
  • Focal length: 400-500mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Exposure mode: aperture priority
  • Drive Mode: Continuous
  • Focus mode: Manual

Sharp focus is essential for strong bird portraits, so the best way to ensure your avian subject’s eyes are in focus is to set your camera to manual focus and pre-focus. point to a spot where you expect the bird to land. If you are an owl and falconry center this will be easy to anticipate as there will be perches that they will use. At home, you set it up yourself by placing a food table with a perch in a convenient location so you can shoot from afar.

An average aperture of around f/8 will provide enough depth of field to ensure the bird’s entire head is in focus, while providing enough background blur to keep it from being a distraction.

When thinking about your background, try framing your bird against a simple background that will contract well and help it stand out in the frame. As a general rule, your background should not compete with the bird for the viewer’s attention. The role of the background in a bird portrait is to complement the plumage of the bird.

Using your continuous shooting mode will ensure you get enough frames to work with if your subject only comes to a quick stop.

For more tips on how to photograph bird portraits, check out our guides on how to photograph close-up birds and how to photograph backyard birds.

Sony A9 vs. Puffin

Best camera settings for birds in flight

  • Shutter speed: 1/2000sec
  • Aperture: f/4
  • Focal length: 300-500mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Exposure Mode: Shutter Priority
  • Drive Mode: Continuous
  • Focus Mode: Subject Tracking / Animal AF / Animal Eye AF

The best camera settings for birds in flight depend on the time of day and the brightness of the sky, but in general you’ll want a shutter speed as fast as possible. To that end, using your camera’s Shutter Priority mode will allow you to set the shutter speed you need and then automatically adjust your other exposure settings to help you achieve it. . Sometimes you may want to use a slower shutter speed if you are panning to capture movement or exposing for a sunset to create a silhouette.

Most cameras now have a subject tracking AF mode, ideal for capturing birds in flight. Additionally, some manufacturers offer animal-specific AF modes and Animal Eye AF modes. These Subject Detection AF modes have become one of the best settings for bird photography and make the difficult task of capturing fast-moving animals much easier.

When composing your image, the direction of flight is an important consideration. You will want more space in the frame in the direction the bird is flying. But if you want dramatic eye contact, you’ll need to position yourself so the bird is flying towards you. The closer you can let it get, the bigger and more impactful it will appear in your frame. The continuous shooting mode, again, helps you capture a range of options here.

Wildlife photographers capture rare animals with the Sony RX10 III

Best camera settings for birds on water

  • Shutter speed: 1/500s
  • Aperture: f/5.6 to f/11
  • Focal length: 400-500mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Exposure mode: aperture priority
  • Drive Mode: Continuous
  • Focus mode: manual or subject tracking

The best camera settings for birds on water really depend on whether you’re trying to freeze motion or capture a calmer portrait. To freeze the action, you’ll need a faster shutter speed – probably 1/1000sec or faster. You’ll probably need to use a wider aperture to get more light into the lens to be able to shoot at those speeds. If not, you can increase your ISO.

Metering is also one of the best settings for bird photography and can be especially tricky when exposing birds on water. Using your camera’s spot metering option helps you get more precise exposures that keep the bird nice and bright and your background dark.

You should also pay attention to your composition here. Like birds in flight, you want to give birds on the water space in the frame to move about.

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David Yarrow reveals the secrets of his most iconic photographs https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/david-yarrow-reveals-the-secrets-of-his-most-iconic-photographs/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 08:49:02 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/david-yarrow-reveals-the-secrets-of-his-most-iconic-photographs/ Written by Jacopo Prisco, CNN When David Yarrow took one of the most iconic sports photographs ever taken, he was, by his own admission, “just a fan with a camera”. It was the 1986 FIFA World Cup final in Mexico, and at 20 he was sitting pitchside. Yarrow – who has since earned millions from […]]]>

Written by Jacopo Prisco, CNN

When David Yarrow took one of the most iconic sports photographs ever taken, he was, by his own admission, “just a fan with a camera”.

It was the 1986 FIFA World Cup final in Mexico, and at 20 he was sitting pitchside. Yarrow – who has since earned millions from his work – had only started taking photos of football matches in Scotland for a local magazine the year before, when he was studying at university. Traveling to the World Cup as a freelancer, he unexpectedly received accreditation from the Scottish Football Association after arriving. But thanks to a rule allowing each nation to have an accredited photographer on the pitch – and the fact that he was the only Scottish shooter left after his country was eliminated – he found himself in a fortuitous position.

Just after Argentina beat West Germany to claim the title, fans flooded the pitch and the winning team lifted their captain, Diego Armando Maradona. Yarrow rushed to the scene and took his now famous photo of Maradona in the air, arms raised, smiling. The image was later syndicated and appeared in publications around the world.

“It’s a special photo,” Yarrow said in a phone interview. “I was lucky. My wide-angle lens wasn’t great, but it looked me straight in the eye. And that showed the importance of getting close.”

Surprisingly, this didn’t immediately launch Yarrow’s photography career. In 1988, he took a job at a bank instead, and later funded his own hedge fund. When the financial crisis hit in 2008, however, her world came crashing down. Photography was always at the back of his mind and he started to chart his course as a career.

“Why would you photograph a bison in the summer? asked Yarrow. “So I went to Yellowstone when it was cold and miserable – because they’re tough animals, and that’s what I wanted to do.” Credit: David Yarrow

“I had financial responsibilities. I had to be a photographer who made quite a bit of money to be able to take care of things in my life,” he said. “So I spent four years working until the day I knew I could make enough money as a photographer to be able to take that risk.”

A life in pictures

The turning point came in 2015, when he took a groundbreaking photo titled “Mankind”, showing Dinka herders at a cattle camp in South Sudan. “I knew I could sell it for a million dollars,” he said. “It’s got depth, it’s got emotion, it’s raw, it’s visceral, and it’s probably one of my most coveted images. And I was right: people are paying $100,000 for this picture now.” (Yarrow typically prints his best photographs in two sets of 12 each, and once they’re gone, they’re gone.)

A 2019 photo of Cindy Crawford with an interesting passenger shotgun, taken in Nevada City, Montana. "I worked a lot with Cindy," said Yarrow. "She is brilliant.  It was the first time that we really worked together.  You need to tell a story.  So you have the guy behind as well as her and the wolf.  You must have more than one layer."

A 2019 photo of Cindy Crawford with an interesting passenger shotgun, taken in Nevada City, Montana. “I worked a lot with Cindy,” Yarrow said. “She’s brilliant. It was our first time working together. You have to tell a story. So you have the guy behind it as well as her and the wolf. You have to have more than one layer.” Credit: David Yarrow

From there, Yarrow went on to make a name for himself in photography taking pictures of more sports stars, models, landscapes and wildlife, becoming an outspoken conservationist. His new book “How I Photograph” is a handy pocket manual with his top tips for succeeding as a photographer, but it also chronicles his journey from hedge fund manager to fine art photographer — because even s he is most famous for his wildlife work, he refuses the label.

A grumpy macaque pictured at Jigokudani Monkey Park in Japan in 2013. "This photo is not even clear," said Yarrow. "It's not even quite right.  But the weather was so miserable and dark and it shows.  This photo is out of print, but if I found another 100 I could sell them all today, because there's something human in that."

A grumpy macaque pictured at Japan’s Jigokudani Monkey Park in 2013. “This photo isn’t even clear,” Yarrow said. “It’s not even quite there. But the weather was so miserable and dark and it shows. This picture is out of print, but if I found another 100 I could sell them all today, because there’s something human about it.” Credit: David Yarrow

“I never thought of myself as a wildlife photographer. I’m a photographer. I never understand why the subject you’re photographing tends to be joined by the word photography; it doesn’t really happen in any other profession,” he said.

Perhaps his main lesson is the importance of planning, which applies to all of his greatest shots, including “Mankind”, which was the result of careful direction and, above all, bringing a ladder to get a view.

Taken in South Sudan in 2015, this photo marked a turning point in Yarrow's career, as it had him portrayed by a prominent American gallerist.

Taken in South Sudan in 2015, this photo marked a turning point in Yarrow’s career, as it had him portrayed by a prominent American gallerist. Credit: David Yarrow

“It was Ansel Adams who taught the world that there are two different types of photographers: people who take pictures and people who take them — and he was an image maker,” Yarrow said. The research, the process that comes before you even pick up the camera is what matters, he added.

Another tenet of his approach is to get close, as evidenced by this historic snapshot of Maradona, as well as many of his striking portraits of beautiful animals, such as panthers, buffaloes and polar bears. Eye contact equals emotion, he said.

"It is about having sharp eyes: the eyes must be sharp.  And it's not easy to do with animals like that, because they move so fast," Yarrow said of this 2018 photograph taken in South Africa.

“It’s about having sharp eyes: eyes have to be sharp. And it’s not easy to do with animals like that, because they move so fast,” Yarrow said of this 2018 photograph. taken in South Africa. Credit: David Yarrow

The book then covers everything from gear to prints (“Make your photos very hard to get,” he said.), with plenty of practical examples and a good compendium of his work, which is mostly black. and white.

Above all, says Yarrow, a photographer must be bold, because the best photos have two key factors: that you can look at them for a long time and that they may never be taken again. “The goal is to take the road less travelled,” he said.

“David Yarrow: How I Photograph” is published by Laurence King.

Add to Queue: In the Wild

To enjoy Yarrow’s wildlife photography in a larger format, this complete 2016 release brings together all of his most important photographs from his wildlife work on seven continents.

A big book for a big project, “Endangered” is the result of years of work by photographer Tim Flach to document the lives of endangered species, including primates facing habitat loss and elephants poached for their ivory. The 180 superb images, often taken against a simple black background, are introduced by a prologue by the eminent zoologist Jonathan Baillie.

Drawing from the collections of the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, photographer Levon Biss has created a unique photographic study of insects. Using microscopic lenses, Biss photographed each specimen, focusing on segments, before stitching together up to 8,000 different photographs to create each image. The result is a spectacular interpretation of insects that were collected from the wild 160 years ago.

This six-part Netflix documentary, shot in locations as diverse as urban areas and jungles, was filmed entirely at night with special cameras capable of operating in the faintest moonlight and in color, as well as sensors of heat that give an otherworldly representation of the savannah. Difficult to produce, the series – shot in 30 countries – is accompanied by a one-hour documentary (“Shot in the dark”) which details its extraordinary technical aspects.

David Attenborough’s latest BBC documentary focuses on the world of plants, but relies on impressive camera technology that essentially shows plants as things that move and breathe. The main innovation is a rig that allows time lapses to be used while filming plants, to speed things up while performing intricate movements around the subject or the forest floor, allowing shots exceptionally dynamic that show these stationary life forms like you. I’ve never really seen them before.

Top image: Yarrow’s famous shot of Diego Maradona during the 1986 FIFA World Cup final in Mexico.

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